Home
Videos uploaded by user “kumaran kumaran”
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Straightening a crooked image-21
 
02:51
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Straightening a crooked image-21
Views: 3556 kumaran kumaran
Windows server 2016 | File Server | Scale Out File Server in server 2016
 
03:27
Windows server 2016 | File Server | Scale Out File Server in server 2016
Views: 4650 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Locks, blocking, and deadlocks-part 13
 
03:10
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Locks, blocking, and deadlocks-part 13
Views: 2223 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Database replication-part 29
 
09:37
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Database replication-part 29
Views: 2158 kumaran kumaran
Windows server 2016 || how to configure NIC teaming in server 2016 || part-8
 
08:20
Windows server 2016 || how to configure NIC teaming in server 2016 || part-8 Windows server 2016 how to configure NIC teaming how to configure NIC teaming in server 2016
Views: 3596 kumaran kumaran
Windows server 2016 | Storage Replication overview in server 2016
 
06:37
Windows server 2016-Storage Replication overview
Views: 1686 kumaran kumaran
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Merging and flattening layers-28
 
04:39
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Merging and flattening layers-28
Views: 6643 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Configure linked servers-part 11
 
05:39
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Configure linked servers-part 11
Views: 3703 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Auditing the database-part 15
 
07:05
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Auditing the database-part 15
Views: 2390 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter7-Group Policy Management ForceUpdate
 
08:00
One challenge that we face when it comes to group policy management has to do with how do we get updates out to our users and our computers once we've made them on a group policy object. Because by default, a user and computer will refresh and go through and do a group policy update every 90 minutes, but what happens when we make a change and we want to make that change take effect right now. Well there's a couple different things that we can do, so let me show you how they're done. In order to demonstrate this, I'm gonna go into DC01. Here on DC01, we're looking at the server manager, and the first thing that I wanna show you is something to where I want you to treat this computer that we're looking at as being the client. Okay, this is the machine that needs to be updated, and in order to do this, we have to go to the command prompt. So I'm gonna click on Start, type in C-M-D, take us right into the command prompt. Here in the command prompt window, the command that we can use, and it's been around pretty much as long as group policy has been around, is gpupdate. Just simply gpupdate, I'll hit enter, and you'll see here that it says it's updating the policy, and in just a moment, it's gonna tell me that the Computer Policy has been updated. There it is, and after that, it will tell me that the User Policy has been updated, and boom, there we go, it's all completed. This is what I would do out on a machine to have that machine refresh through all the group policies that are linked to containers that affect this particular computer, or the user that's logged in to this computer. Now please, keep in mind, that this is done on a computer-by-computer basis, right, so this is just one at a time. It is not a remote update, so it's something that, in a scenario where, let's say a user has called you and there's a problem and you realize that problem was caused by a group policy, you update that group policy, and you want the user to get the changes right away, you would tell them to open up a command prompt and run gpupdate. This would not be something that would work very well if you made a change and you wanted to update a lot of computers all at once. I'll show you how to do that in just a moment. Before I do, I do wanna also show you that gpudate has some switches that you might wanna be familiar with. So I'm gonna type in gpupdate and put in a forward slash question mark, for help, and then from there, I'm gonna scroll back up to the top, and point out a couple of switches. Now there's a number of them here to look at. The two main switches that I want you to be familiar with are the very first two listed here. The first one is target. This one confuses a lot of people. If you do forward slash target, colon, and then you have computer or user. Now a lot of people think, oh this is a great way for me to do a gpudate and do it targeting a specific computer or a specific user. That is not what this is. We're not saying, aim this at a certain computer or user, but rather, we're targeting to only update the computer settings, or only update the user settings. That's what that switch actually means. Okay, this is not a way of targeting a specific computer or user. The next one is forward slash force, and this is a way to forcefully say to the computer, and really or the user logged in, please reapply the entire group policy. Pretend like we're starting from scratch. Do all the settings, not just anything that might have changed. So that's what forward slash force is. Now, the next one here. I'm gonna kinda skip past this wait switch. It's not one that is commonly used, and you can read what it does here. It sets the number of seconds to wait for the policy processing to finish. Not a big issue there. And the next two, slash logoff and slash boot, while they can be important, I kinda have not really seen where it makes a whole lot of sense to use them. Slash logoff, you'll see here, it says causes a logoff after the Group Policy settings have been updated, and slash boot causes the computer to reboot after the Group Policy settings have been applied. Now, some updates, and you'll read if you read the rest of the help document here, you'll see is because certain client-side extensions don't actually update unless the user actually logs off and logs back in, or unless the computer is actually rebooted. So, the switches make a lot of sense. The problem is, why not just ask the user to logoff and log back on, or to reboot the computer? And then the gpupdate command just doesn't even need it. All right, so , yes, technically you can do the gpupdate to make sure the system truly has updated and then do the logoff or the reboot but personally I've found that it's just an unnecessary step. You can just have logoff and log back on, or just simply do a reboot. All right, so that's the gpupdate command.And More... To Know.
Views: 932 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter13-Group Policy Delegation
 
05:18
Delegation of group policy object-related tasks will allow you the ability to potentially distribute certain administrative workload to different people across the enterprise. So, for instance, you could have one group who is responsible for creating and editing group policy objects while another group might do reporting and analysis. Now there are six specific functions that you can delegate when it comes to group policy objects. You can choose who can create GPOs, edit GPOs, manage the links of GPOs, do the group policy modeling analysis, and then there's also group policy results analysis, and then the creating of WMI filters. So let me show you how you can set each one of these. And in order to demonstrate this, I'm already on DC1 and I'm in the group policy management tool. And the first one, let's just kind of hit these in the same order I threw them at you. We'll talk about creating GPOs. Here on the group policy objects container, if I highlight this container, you'll notice there's a Delegation tab. And if I click on that Delegation tab, you will see that it says, "The following groups "and users can create GPOs in this domain." Now by default, you'll see that that belongs to the domain admins and the group policy creator owners. So what this means is, if you want a user or some group to also be able to create GPOs in this domain, you could either make them a member of, well, you could do domain admins but I wouldn't recommend it because then they're going to have all sorts of other functionality, but you could make them a member of the group policy creator owners group. Or, you could simply come down here and just add them to this list. So, this is not a very good example in the real world that I would be saying that the sales users could do this, but it's the only group I have in this domain. So I will select it just to show you that I can add a group right here. And now, this group has the ability to create group policy objects in this domain. The next would be editing. And for that, you have to go to each individual group policy object. So if I expand this and then click on a group policy object, again, there is a Delegation tab. And if I click on that Delegation tab, you will see that there is a list here ranging from authenticated users who can simply read. Then there's the domain and enterprise admins who have the ability to edit settings as well as delete or even modify security. And if I want to allow somebody the ability to go ahead and edit these settings, then we can add them. So once again, I'll just go ahead and do my sales users. And then they want to know, well what permission are you giving them? And I could just leave it at Read and then that would be just like the authenticated users. Or I can say that they can edit settings. Or, if we want to give them that full ability to edit, delete, and modify security for others, we could that. But in this case, we're talking about editing settings, so I will select that, click OK, and there you go. Now my sales users have the ability to edit settings on this group policy object. Now when it comes to having the ability to link group policy objects. This is done on a container by container basis. So for instance, here's our sales organizational unit. And you'll see here that on the delegation tab, we have the ability to allow a group the ability to link GPOs. So let's go ahead and let's add another group in here. This would be the perfect place to do something sales related. And More... To Know.
Views: 889 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter8-Group Policy Management Folder Redirection
 
09:03
Group Policy Settings:- One of the challenges that our users actually face when working in large enterprise environments is that they sit down at the computer and they do things at that local computer to make their environment comfortable for themselves. And then they have to move to another computer, and everything that they did to customize and make it comfortable for themselves goes away. And the reason why is that by default, user profiles are stored locally. Now in the old days, we would solve this through the use of something called roaming user profiles. But roaming user profiles come with some significant challenges of their own, primarily surrounding network bandwidth in that the entire profile needs to be downloaded to an individual computer when a user log in and uploaded when the user logs off. So the way we resolve this problem in Windows Server 2012 is through something called folder redirection. So here we are, I'm already on DC01 and I'm looking at the Group Policy Management tool. And in order to demonstrate folder redirection, I want to show you that inside my sales organizational unit, I've already created a GPO called Folder Redirection. Understand that this has just been named Folder Redirection. I haven't actually set anything up, okay? So this is just a blank GPO that I've newly created just for the sake of demonstrating. So what I'm going to do is I'm going to right-click on this GPO and select Edit. Inside the Group Policy Management Editor, under User Configuration, I'm going to expand Policies, I'll expand Windows Settings, then here you'll see we have Folder Redirection. Now let me expand this bar over a little bit so we have room to see, because I'm going to expand Folder Redirection and show you that there's a number of different objects that can be redirected. Now what do we mean by redirect? Well, these objects that we see in the list here are all things that can be found as a part of the user's local profile, okay, which means that they're stored on a local computer. We can take any and all of these items and we can make them look local to the user but actually store them out on a server. Now the one that I'm going to use here in this demonstration is the one that's probably done more often than anything else, and that is the documents folder. And the reason why is because this is more than just a customization of a user's work environment, this also solve the issue of not having user store things on their own local computer, right? We want them out on servers where we can back them up and we can have control over them. So I'm going to right-click on the Documents folder, and select Properties. You'll see that it's currently not configured. And in order to configure, we have two options. The first option is called basic, which is where we redirect everyone's folder to the same network location. And when we say everyone, it doesn't necessarily mean everyone in the entire enterprise. Remember, it's only everyone that's being affected by this particular group policy object. But in the event that this GPO is affecting too many users to store in one location, we do have an advanced option where we can specify individual locations for different Windows groups, all right? So they're both done pretty much the same way other than one, you have to set up multiple locations and the other, you just set up one location. So to demonstrate, I'm going to choose basic. From there, you'll see here that it's going to create a folder for each user under the root path. And the path that I'm going to choose in order to show you this, let me click Browse for a moment, we're not going to do it this way but I want to show you, if I click Browse, on the local C drive of this computer, I just want to show you I did actually create some folders and one of them here is called SalesUserDocs, and I've also shared that folder. So I've created that network location that we're going to redirect to. Now the reason I'm going to hit Cancel instead of just selecting it, is because you don't want to select a local path. What I want to do is put in double backslash, DC01, which is the name of the server, backslash, salesuserdocs, which is the name of the share, and you'll notice that it automatically, down here, is giving you an example that says if you had a user named Claire, inside this share, we're going to create a folder for Claire and then we're going to create a documents folder inside of that folder, all right? So this is all going to be done for you by the system. You only have to point to the one shared location. Now before we actually apply these settings, I would like to show you that there is another tab here, it's actually the Settings tab, and there's a few extra items here you can select.
Views: 849 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Collation and Unicode support-part 10
 
04:16
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Collation and Unicode support-part 10
Views: 5594 kumaran kumaran
React js tutorial Why is React fast Part 2
 
02:05
React js tutorial Why is React fast Part 2
Views: 371 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Log shipping-part 30
 
05:55
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Log shipping-part 30
Views: 866 kumaran kumaran
Photoshop tutorial 2017 | How to Create a Denim Text Effect
 
13:07
Photoshop tutorial 2017 | How to Create a Denim Text Effect
Views: 518 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter6-Group Policy Management SlowLink
 
06:12
The application of certain settings within certain Group Policy objects can sometimes be bandwidth intensive. You might find yourself in a situation where you have a computer that is attempting to apply the settings from a Group Policy object over a slow network connection to where it's really struggling to keep up with the resources that are needed. So in order to deal with this, we have something called slow link detection. So I'd like to show you how to put that into place. In order to do this, we need to go to a domain controller. So I'm going to jump onto DC 1. Here on DC 1 in the Server Manager, I'm going to come up to the Tools menu and select Group Policy Management. Here in Group Policy Management, I'm going to expand everything out just to go ahead and jump into one of our policies. It really doesn't matter because I just want to show you where the setting is and how you would enable it. So I'm going to take our default domain policy. Right click, select Edit. Here in the Group Policy Management editor, under the Computer Configuration, I'm going to expand Policies. I'll expand Administrative Templates, then System. I will move this over a little bit so we have some room to see everything, and I will select Group Policy. Over here on the right, there is a setting called Configure Group Policy Slow Link Detection. So I'm going to go into that setting, so we can take a look at what this means. Now again, there is a Help dialogue box here where you can read the details of it, but it basically goes on to say that this is a setting that helps you to determine and recognize if there is a slow connection, and the idea is that maybe certain policy settings won't be applied in the event that there's not a network connection that can actually satisfy the need. Now that's not necessarily always the case. In other words, we're using this to recognize a slow link, but down in here, you'll see, right here in the third paragraph is says, "The system's response to a slow policy connection" "varies among policies." So it has to do with the program that's actually implementing the policy that will specify what the response is to the slow link. Enabling this policy is just giving the system the ability to actually detect the presence of the slow link. In order to do this, you simply enable the setting and then specify what speed is considered to be slow. The default, it always defaults here to 500 kBps. Ok, so we're saying that if you're at roughly half a megabit per second of throughput or less, then that's considered to be a slow link, and you should go ahead and act accordingly. Now, there is also a slow link detection on the user side of things. The computer side has to do with the computer policies and the user side has to do with the user policies. Let me go ahead and cancel out here because there is another setting that I'd like to show you that is new to Windows Server 2012 R2. It's one way of kind of working in conjunction with slow links and dealing with at least some of the issue here. Really, it doesn't have to do with dealing with settings being applied when there's a slow link, it has to do with helping to speed up the logon process, at least in theory. I've read a number of different articles which some agree and some argue whether it really speeds up the logon process. Most of them tend to come to the same conclusion, which is if you have certain scenarios, it can help, but that setting that we want to look at is just a couple above here where it says Configure Group Policy Caching. So this policy is going to allow you the ability to have the Group Policy settings cached locally after every, and it says right here, "after every background processing session." Ok, so in other words, it saves any applicable GPO's and the settings within them on the local machine. Now as part of this process, what it's going to also do, and again, there's quite a long Help explanation here, if you read through the whole thing. Not necessarily on the screen as I'm showing it to you, but if you find yourself on a system and you want to read this thing, what you will see is it will go through, and once it's enabled, you will set a slow link value and a timeout value that it will go through. Again, right here, let me scroll this back up a little bit. You'll see here it says, "The slow link value" "is what will determine how long the Group Policy" "will wait for a response from a domain controller" "before reporting the link speed as slow." You'll notice that the default is the same as it is in slow link detection.And More... To Know.
Views: 552 kumaran kumaran
Vue js | Learn Vue Instance,Directives and V if,V for,V on and more
 
37:01
Vue js | Learn Vue Instance,Directives and V if,V for,V on,Components,V model and Computed Properties
Views: 118 kumaran kumaran
Windows server 2016 || configure Multiple network interface controller NIC in server 2016 || part-7
 
04:50
Windows server 2016 || configure Multiple network interface controller NIC in server 2016 || part-7 Windows server 2016 configure Multiple network interface controller NIC in server 2016
Views: 2092 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter3-GPO Exceptions
 
07:28
Sometimes we find ourselves in a position where the default processing order in the application and inheritance of group policy objects doesn't necessarily work for us. Fortunately, Microsoft has given us a couple of exceptions that we can throw in to the mix here. And so I want to go over them with you now, but before I do, I want to emphasize the word "exception." And what I mean by that is what I'm gonna show you in this lesson I want you to use sparingly. Okay? These should be the exceptions to the rule. A well-designed network would go ahead and utilize the default processing order. It's only when you find yourself in a position that it just won't work. So here on the screen I have our LSDOU model, and so this would be the default processing order. And I want to use this to illustrate these two exceptions. The first one is something called "block inheritance." Block inheritance is something you would apply to a specific container that you would link group policy objects to. And typically it would be a container lower down in the processing order, like an organizational unit. So what I'm gonna do here is I'm gonna put up a so-called wall, so to speak, between Domain and Organizational Unit. And this means that I've put up block inheritance on the Organizational Unit, which says, "Do not inherit any of the group policy object settings "from higher up in the hierarchy." So, in other words, "Ignore the local site and domain policies. "I only want to apply the settings "that are in a group policy object "that is linked directly to this container." The second exception that I want to talk to you about is something called "enforced." Before I explain "enforced," I do want to tell you that if you've worked with group policy in previous versions of Windows Server, you'd have to go all way back to Windows Server 2003 or Windows 2000, but if you did work with group policy back then and you were familiar with something called "no override," that was the exact same thing as what I'm now gonna explain "enforced" is. They just changed the name. It's the exact same rule. So what "enforced" does. The first thing is I will tell you, you don't attach an enforced rule to a container like you do block inheritance. You would attach it to a link of a group policy object. So, what I'm gonna do here is I'm going to link a group policy object to the domain, in this case. And again, usually this is something you would do higher up, so whereas block inheritance you do further down, the enforced you do higher up. And the reason why is because when I enforce this link, okay, so it's not the group policy object itself and it's not the domain container, it's this link of the GPO to this particular container, it's gonna do two things. The first thing is it is going to bust right through any block inheritance walls that have been put up. So if a GPO link has been enforced, it means that these settings will be taken all the way down through the processing order regardless of any block inheritance attempts that have been made. The second thing that it does is we know that in the default processing order the whole reason we have it is to resolve conflicts. And we know that the rule is that the last setting that was applied will win. So if we have a GPO that turns something off and then another GPO later on that turns it on, it ends up in the "on" position, because that is the last one to be applied. "Enforced" makes it that whatever this setting is, wins regardless of if there are any other settings later on in the processing order that conflict with it. So it wins all conflicts. So that's the concept of how block inheritance and the enforced policies works. Let's go ahead and jump over to one of our servers and see how we would put these settings in place. In order to take a look at this, we need to go to a domain controller because that's where we manage our group policy objects. So, I'm going to open up DC01, one of the domain controllers we have running on our network. Here on DC01, I'm in the Server Manager, so I'm gonna go up to the Tools menu, and the tool I'm gonna select is Group Policy Management. Here in the Group Policy Management window, over in the left, we can see here that we have our landonhotel.local forest, and if I expand that, I have all the domains that would be in that forest. In this case I only have the one, so here is the landonhotel.local domain. If I expand that domain, there is a couple of things I'm gonna find. Well, actually there is a lot of things I'm gonna find, but a couple we gonna talk about right now. One would be this very first item which is the Default Domain Policy. So this is a policy that has been linked to this container. And the container being the domain container. The other thing we find below that policy are all the other organizational unit containers that are within this domain.And More... To Know
Views: 339 kumaran kumaran
React Js Course | Build React Js countdown App Project | Styling with React Bootstrap - 13
 
04:18
reactjs tutorial reactjs reactjs videos reactjs app react js react component reacrjs flux react js flux react app how to use reactjs javascript framework how to create reactjs application React Js Course
Views: 1498 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter2-Understanding The Group Policy Processing Order And Application
 
07:33
When it comes to understanding the Group Policy processing order and application, there is a term that I really want you to become familiar with, and that term is L S D OU. Now you'll notice if you look on the screen that L S D OU is not really a term, it's just a bunch of letters, but I said it in the form of almost as though it's a word. Right, L S D OU, and the reason why is because the understanding of Group Policy processing order and application is so important that over the years as I've been working with it, it has just become basically like a word, or a term for me. Alright, so what do these letters actually stand for? Well they stand for each of the containers that a Group Policy object can be linked to. Alright, so the first one, L, is simply local, and it's not so much that a Group Policy object can be linked to a local container, it's that we can have a local Group Policy object. Then from there, we do have the three types of container objects that we can link Group Policy objects to, and they are site, domain, and organizational unit. So, that's just an understanding of the different places that we can have Group Policy objects being applied to and being linked to, but why do we specifically say L S D OU, or what is the importance of the order of local, site, domain, and organization unit? Well, let's talk about what happens when, for instance, a computer turns on, which is when the computer settings are applied. Well when the computer turns on, the first thing that happens is it looks at the local GPO, if one exists, and really I shouldn't say if it exists, because it always exists. It's just a matter of whether any settings have been applied to it. If there are any settings applied to the local GPO, then it applies those to the computer that's being turned on. Then from there, the system will check to see what site a computer belongs to, and it will then look to see if there are any Group Policy objects that have been linked to that site and it will then apply any settings that are in any GPO's that are found linked to the site. It then proceeds to do the same process for whatever domain the computer belongs to. Then it looks into the organizational unit that the computer account would belong to, or reside in and technically I really should say that L S D OU is L S D OU OU OU. The reason why is because typically we have not just one level of organizational units, but we have a hierarchy of them. When you look to see what container or what organizational unit an object resides in, it may not be a top-level organizational unit, it may be a child OU down in the hierarchy. So what will actually happen there is while the computer account for instance, let's say, resides down in a child organizational unit, and I have it illustrated here as though it's a couple levels deep, what would actually happen is the system would first look at the top-level organizational unit, or the top parent-level organizational unit in that hierarchy, look to see if there's any Group Policy objects linked to that OU, and then apply them, and then it works its way down to the next level through the hierarchy, checking each step along the way to see if there's any Group Policy objects that are linked to that container, until it finally ends up down at the organizational unit level that the object resides in. Now I mentioned that this happens when the computer turns on, and that is for the computer settings. This whole process will actually happen again when the user logs in and it will do it for the user-based settings, based upon what containers that the user may belong to or reside in. What does this matter, that we're talking about this whole L S D OU? Why does it matter that we go to local, then site, then domain, and then the organizational unit? Well, many of the GPO settings can be either set to enabled, disabled, or not confiigured and I like to think of it as almost kind of like saying, we're either going to turn something on, we're going to turn it off, or maybe we just leave it alone. And more.......................to know.
Views: 351 kumaran kumaran
React js tutorial Understanding the component life cycle Part 12
 
02:06
React js tutorial Understanding the component life cycle Part 12
Views: 235 kumaran kumaran
React Js Basics | Creating Navigation Links
 
05:07
This React JS Course will help you get quickly up to pace with React.js development. React is an AMAZING Javascript framework that allows you to build extremely stable applications that are very easy to change and modify as the application changes and grows over time.
Views: 1353 kumaran kumaran
React Js Course | Build React Js countdown App Project | Helper Methods - 12
 
02:39
reactjs tutorial reactjs reactjs videos reactjs app react js react component reacrjs flux react js flux react app how to use reactjs javascript framework how to create reactjs application React Js Course
Views: 396 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Understanding service accounts-part 5
 
03:39
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Understanding service accounts-part 5
Views: 1719 kumaran kumaran
Windows Server 2012 R2-Chapter11-Group Policy Admin Preferences
 
06:07
Group Policy Settings:- Prior to the release of Windows Server 2008, you couldn't use group policy to control certain common settings that would effect the user and computer environment. An example of this might be mapping a network drive. What we had to do back then was we would have to deliver this type of setting through the use of logon script. Well now in Windows Sever 2012 we have group policy preferences built right in and these preferences are extensions to the original policy settings that now allow us the ability to deploy settings such as a map drive through group policy. In order to demonstrate this, I'm already on DC1. We're in Group Policy Management. I wanna show you the inside of my Sales organizational unit. I have created a GPO and named it Map Drive. It's a blank GPO but I've named it Map Drive because that's what we're gonna do. If I right click and then select to Edit, you'll see here in the Group Policy Management Editor, under both Computer and User Configuration, there's a preferences folder where we have both Windows Settings and Control Panel Settings. If I further expand those out, and I'll move this over so we can read everything you'll see that there are a number of different items that are specific to a user's or a computer's environment that we now can control directly with group policy so I'm gonna demonstrate the exact example I just mentioned which is mapping a network drive. You'll notice that I have here under my User Configuration, under Windows Settings, Drive Maps. Now, I already showed you how to map a drive in a different lesson in this course where I was working with logon scripts but, now, I'm gonna show you how we would do it using preferences. So, if I just simply right click and select New, Mapped Drive, I get a window that is not really like anything that we've seen in any of our other policy settings. Here, I need to put in an actual location of where this shared folder's gonna be that we're gonna map to so I'm gonna put in \\dc01\salesdocs and, I'll tell you what, I'm gonna leave this open for just a moment while I come down here and open up Windows Explorer because I just wanna show you that on the local C drive I do have a folder called SalesDocs. If I right click on that folder and go to it's properties, and then go to Sharing, you will see that it is shared as DC01\SalesDocs. I just wanted you to understand that this has been put in place already. Now, from there, I need to assign it a drive letter. So, I'm gonna tell it to use, and since it's salesdocs, why not go ahead and use the S drive and, at this point, I pretty much could just be done. I could just click OK and go on my way. That's really all there is to setting up this drive map but I do wanna show you under the Common tab that we do have some additional options. So, because of the different type of setting that we're working with here, we have some additional choices like we can choose the stop processing items in this extension if it runs into an error. We can run in the logged on user's security context. We can remove this item when it's no longer applied and the reason why that's important, this checkbox right here Remove this item when it's no longer applied is because unlike a regular group policy setting where it's reapplied again and again and again, in this case, once it's been put in place it's kind of like a permanent registry change and that's actually somewhat controllable right here by Apply once and do not reapply or whether you want it to keep reapplying over and over again. The main reason why I wanted to take you to this tab is because I wanted to show you this is one of the really nice features about group policy preferences and it's something called Item-level targeting. This is where I can get very specific in my targeting so, if I say I want to do a new item, I can create some form of criteria in order for this setting to take place. Now, I can do something simply like just say only members of a certain Windows Security Group or I could even break it right down to a specific user but I can also it based upon a computer, a computer that has processor that has a certain amount of speed or memory of a certain amount and, if none of these perfectly match something that I'm trying to target, I can even do a full blown WMI Query and set up my own rules and that is something that is unique to group policy preferences and that's where they have become so popular. At this point, I'm gonna go ahead and click OK and then we will go ahead and close out of here. Let's go ahead and jump over to our client and see if this actually worked. So, here I am a Windows 10 client and I would like to show you, if I go into Windows Explorer, there's only the C drive and the DVD drive. And More... To Know.
Views: 456 kumaran kumaran
How to Connect Multiple Database in CodeIgniter
 
01:42
How to Connect Multiple Database in CodeIgniter
Views: 667 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Configure instance properties-part 8
 
08:47
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Configure instance properties-part 8
Views: 182 kumaran kumaran
Mega Downloader
 
02:13
Download:-http://www107.zippyshare.com/v/1BOn1tK3/file.html
Views: 149 kumaran kumaran
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Choosing color modes and bit depth-14
 
06:20
Photoshop CC 2017 Tutorial-Choosing color modes and bit depth-14
Views: 144 kumaran kumaran
Dating Tips | Extreme Stamina | Physiology Part-3
 
13:53
Dating Tips | Extreme Stamina | Physiology Part-3
Views: 117 kumaran kumaran
How To Earn Money From Ecommerce Store 1
 
07:22
How To Earn Money From Ecommerce Store 1
Views: 2031 kumaran kumaran
Photoshop tutorial 2017 | How to create lightning bolt animation
 
27:35
Photoshop tutorial 2017 | How to create lightning bolt animation
Views: 376 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Logon triggers-part 23
 
04:18
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Logon triggers-part 23
Views: 333 kumaran kumaran
React Js Course | Build React Js countdown App Project | Introducing Props -9
 
02:22
reactjs tutorial reactjs reactjs videos reactjs app react js react component reacrjs flux react js flux react app how to use reactjs javascript framework how to create reactjs application React Js Course
Views: 693 kumaran kumaran
How To Host Websites From Your Computer Part-1
 
10:17
How To Host Websites From Your Computer
Views: 3273 kumaran kumaran
React js tutorial React js syntax Part 4
 
02:23
React js tutorial React js syntax Part 4
Views: 95 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Backup and restore strategies-part 24
 
03:31
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Backup and restore strategies-part 24
Views: 129 kumaran kumaran
React Js Course | Build countdown App Project Introduction - 1
 
01:17
Build countdown App Project reactjs tutorial reactjs reactjs videos reactjs app react js react component reacrjs flux react js flux react app how to use reactjs javascript framework how to create reactjs application
Views: 998 kumaran kumaran
React Js Basics | Accessing DOM Elements
 
05:24
This React JS Course will help you get quickly up to pace with React.js development. React is an AMAZING Javascript framework that allows you to build extremely stable applications that are very easy to change and modify as the application changes and grows over time.
Views: 116 kumaran kumaran
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Database storage-part 3
 
02:55
Sql server 2016 Tutorial-Database storage-part 3
Views: 171 kumaran kumaran
React Js Course | Build React Js countdown App Project | Updating State - 6
 
03:50
reactjs tutorial reactjs reactjs videos reactjs app react js react component reacrjs flux react js flux react app how to use reactjs javascript framework how to create reactjs application React Js Course
Views: 389 kumaran kumaran
Setup your own web hosting | What is DNS and Dynamic DNS - Part-2
 
12:16
Setup your own web hosting | What is DNS and Dynamic DNS - Part-2 web server, web hosting, php, mysql, apache, hosting, server, wordpress, cpanel, web hosting service (industry), vps, make money, make money online, wamp server, how to, create your own website, hosting minecraft, minecraft server, minecraft, mail server, game, self reliance, hosting a web server at home, game server, hosting your own server, hosting a game server at home, diy, hosting your own game server, hosting your own web server, diy hosting, home hosting, small business hosting, small business server, personal website, home website, personal web server, home web server, home server, host a server, free server
Views: 398 kumaran kumaran
React js tutorial What is React Part 1
 
01:25
React js tutorial What is React Part 1
Views: 347 kumaran kumaran
Windows server 2016-Planning server roles-part11
 
03:32
Windows server 2016-Planning server roles-part11
Views: 21 kumaran kumaran
React js tutorial Mounting components Part 13
 
03:55
React js tutorial Mounting components Part 13
Views: 74 kumaran kumaran

Romeo and juliet text response essay topics
Virginia woolf modern fiction essay summary samples
An essay concerning human understanding analysis of informational texts
Music easy essay format
Business topics for essay