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Edward Hopper's Creative Process
 
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Edward Hopper discusses the slow development of his iconic images, part of the exhibition Hopper Drawing: A Painter's Process at the Walker Art Center.
Views: 63455 Walker Art Center
The Forger's Masterclass - Ep. 1 - Edward Hopper
 
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A Hopper landscape may look simple to copy, but the biggest challenge for the students is to bring a soulless landscape to life.
Views: 257257 TheArtyBartfast
ART/ARCHITECTURE - Edward Hopper
 
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Edward Hopper spent his life painting alienated scenes that aren't depressing in the least to look at. They make us feel less alone. He used art therapeutically: to reconcile us to the isolation inside every one of us. Please subscribe to our channel: http://tinyurl.com/o28mut7] If you like our films take a look at our shop (we ship worldwide): http://www.theschooloflife.com/shop/all/ Brought to you by http://www.theschooloflife.com Produced in collaboration with Khyan Mansley http://www.YouTube.com/Khyan #TheSchoolOfLife
Views: 189233 The School of Life
Reproduccion (NightHawks Edward Hopper)
 
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Reproducción NightHawks Edward Hopper Oleo Instagram: JUAN REY (@juannashe) Contacto:[email protected] Canción de Micah P Hinson - Beneath the Rose Titulo: NightHawks Artista: Edward Hopper Ubicación: Art Institute of Chicago Building Hand-Painted Art Reproduction with Oil on Canvas
Views: 3422 Juan Rey
Edward Hopper - Nighthawks (1942)
 
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A diner, at the corner of desolate streets, at night. Through the large windows we can peek at the waiter and his three guests. What is the meaning of this intriguing scene? Art History Online presents 'Nighthawks' by American painter Edward Hopper (1882–1967). By watching this video you'll learn the major facts about 'Nighthawks, The painting will be visually analyzed (composition, ordonnance, color, technique, style, etc.) and the common interpretations are explained.
Views: 5845 Art History Online
Tua - Edward Hopper (Komplex Vol. 4)
 
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TUA ist zurück und veröffentlicht endlich sein langerwartetes Album! Die erste Single "Vorstadt" ist ab jetzt draußen. TUA erscheint am 22.03.2019. ► "Vorstadt" hier streamen und downloaden: https://tua.lnk.to/VorstadtID ► Das neue Album "TUA" hier vorbestellen: https://tua.lnk.to/TUAID Die Tua KOSMOS Box gibt es hier: Physisch: http://chmp.pro/tua.kosmos oder http://chmp.pro/tua.kosmos.s.am iTunes: http://chmp.pro/tua.album.s.it Google Play:http://chmp.pro/tua.album.s.gp Spotify: http://chmp.pro/tua.spotify Apple Music: http://chmp.pro/tua.applemusic Neues Tua Merch: http://chmp.style/tua.yt Credits: Film: Vau.Media Kamera: Vassilios Parashidis Drohne: Niclas Schmied Edit: Vasi, Tua Folge Tua: Insta: https://www.instagram.com/tuamusik/ Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/diesertua Twitter: http://twitter.com/bigtua Spotify: http://chmp.pro/tua.spotify
Views: 23652 Chimperator Channel
Hopper's Nighthawks: Look Through The Window
 
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SUPPORT THE NERDWRITER HERE AND HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES FOR RESEARCH: http://www.jstor.org/stable/41178875? http://www.jstor.org/stable/4104321? http://aladinrc.wrlc.org/bitstream/handle/1961/16563/Gulan_american_0008N_10610display.pdf?sequence=1 http://www.nga.gov/content/ngaweb/audio-video/video/wyeth-edward-hopper.html https://en.wikipedia.org/wiki/Edward_Hopper http://www.artnews.com/2013/07/25/how-edward-hopper-storyboarded-nighthawks/ http://morethanjustwine.blogspot.com/2013/02/edward-hopper-light-shade-and.html
Views: 705267 Nerdwriter1
Richard Tuschman - Hopper Meditations - Photography - Edward Hopper
 
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"Hopper Meditations" is a personal photographic response to the work of the American painter, Edward Hopper. I have always loved the way Hopper’s paintings, with an economy of means, are able to address the psychological mysteries and complexities of the human condition. Placing one or two figures in humble, intimate settings, he created quiet scenes that are psychologically compelling with open-ended narratives. The characters’ emotional states can seem to waver paradoxically between reverie and alienation, or perhaps between longing and resignation. Dramatic lighting heightens the emotional overtones, but any final interpretation is left to the viewer. These are all qualities I hope to imbue in my images as well. In other ways, my pictures diverge from Hopper’s paintings. The general mood in my work is more somber, and the lighting is less harsh, than in Hopper’s. I am trying to achieve an effect perhaps closer to the chiaroscuro lighting of Rembrandt, another painter I greatly admire. I would like the lighting to act as almost another character, not only illuminating the form of the figures, but also echoing and evoking their inner lives. I like to think of my images as dramas for a small stage, with the figures as actors in a one or two character play. The characters, by appearance, are rooted specifically in the past, somewhere in Hopper’s mid-twentieth century. For me, this augments the dreamlike, staged effect of the scenes. The themes they evoke, though—solitude, alienation, longing—are timeless and universal. Richard Tuschman Richard Tuschman creates poetic photographic images for book covers, magazines, advertising and gallery exhibition. He began experimenting with digital imaging in the early 1990’s, developing the signature style that synthesized his interests in graphic design, photography, painting and assemblage. This digital work found a wide audience in the commercial sector, and his work has since been featured on the pages of magazines, annual reports, book jackets, and catalogs for clients such as Adobe Systems, The New York Times, Penguin, Sony Music, Newsweek, and Random House, among others. Tuschman’s award- winning work has been recognized by, among others, American Photography, Print, AIGA, Photo District News, American Illustration, and Prix de la Photographie, Paris. He has lectured widely on his artistic technique and creative process, and has taught at Cuyahoga Community College (Cleveland, OH), University of Akron School of Art, and Ringling College of Art + Design (Sarasota, FL). He currently lives and works in New York City. Music; Bohren & der club of gore - Constant fear
Views: 13023 E ī h w a z
Marnie – Edward Hopper
 
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http://painting-movies.com Opening sequence of Hitchcock's "Marnie" rendered with Hopper's "Nighthawks" Painting: Nighthawks Edward Hopper USA 1942 Movie: Marnie Alfred Hitchcock USA 1964 References Gatys, L.A., Ecker, A.S., Bethge, M.: A neural algorithm of artistic style. CoRR abs/1508.06576 (2015). http://arxiv.org/abs/1508.06576 Ruder, Manuel, Dosovitskiy, Alexey, Brox, Thomas: Artistic style transfer for videos. CoRR abs/1604.08610 (2016). http://arxiv.org/abs/1604.08610 Johnson, Justin: Torch implementation of neural style algorithm (2015). http://github.com/jcjohnson/neural-style
Edward Hopper
 
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The American painter Edward Hopper was one of the foremost exponents of twentieth-century Realism. Although he did not attract the attention of critics or the public for much of his life and was forced to work as an illustrator to earn a living, his works are now icons of modern life and society Hopper. studied at the New York School of Art with William Merrit Chase and Robert HenriHe. made several trips to Europe and was interested in European culture and art from a very early age, particularly the work of Edgar Degas and Édouard Manet. In 1910 he settled permanently into his New York home in Washington Square, which he left only during his summer sojourns in New England, from 1930 onwards chiefly in Cape Cod, where he had a house built. In 1924 he married Jo Nivinson, who not only posed for him on numerous occasions but furthermore kept a detailed record of his work throughout his life. Hopper's artistic output is relatively small, as he painted at a slow, leisurely pace. He was initially connected with the so-called American Scene, a heterogeneous group of artists who shared the same interest in typically American themes, but Hopper soon developed his own personal style of painting. His taciturn nature and austere manner were powerfully reflected in his oeuvre, which is characterised as a whole by its simplified depiction of reality and mastery at capturing contemporary man's solitude. His painting provides an insight into the America of the Great Depression, which for him symbolised the crisis of modern life Hopper's. cinematic handling of scenes and personal use of light are the main features that set his painting apart. Although he painted a few landscapes and outdoor scenes, most of his works feature public places — such as bars, motels, stations and trains — that are practically empty in order to underline the loneliness of the person depicted. Hopper further heightens the dramatic effect by means of powerful contrasts of light and shadow Hopper's. fame spread considerably towards 1930 as a result of isolationism, though his critical fortunes did not start to grow until his death in 1967, when he began to be acknowledged as one of the Great Masters of twentieth-century art and not just as an example of American realist painting. Music: "Easy" Artist: Dragonette Album: Fixin To Thrill
Views: 415 Magnu Conatu
UBFJ Gas Hopper
 
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-uploaded in HD at http://www.TunesToTube.com
Views: 175 Franck Jack
KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper // Sneak Peek Three
 
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KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper DIRECTED BY: LAUREN CARNESI Choreography by: Lauren Carnesi, Liz Fink, Alexa Conway & Leslie Perry Guest Performances by Liz Fink & Dustin Kimball Performance on Friday, July 24, 2015 Ticket Information: http://harford.universitytickets.com/user_pages/event.asp?id=864&cid=27 Harford Dance Theatre presents an all new production, KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper. Inspired by the 1940s America portrayed in the stunning paintings of iconic American artist, Edward Hopper, this original dance-theater production tells a timeless yet unique story of love and hope set in the midst of WWII. Join us at 7 PM for an informative pre-show discussion on Edward Hopper, his most famous works, and the time period in which he painted to gain context on the show's inspiration! Guest Speaker: Jeffrey Ball, Associate Professor of Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts at HCC. For further information contact Jordan Williams Harford Dance Theatre Company Manager [email protected] or 443-412-2112 https://www.facebook.com/HarfordDanceTheatre?fref=ts
Views: 422 Lauren Carnesi
Edward Hopper
 
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Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 May 15, 1967) was a prominent American realist painter and printmaker. While most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching. In both his urban and rural scenes, his spare and finely calculated renderings reflected his personal vision of modern American life. With his paintings, Hopper paid particular attention to geometrical design and the careful placement of human figures in proper balance with their environment. He was a slow and methodical artist; as he wrote, It takes a long time for an idea to strike. Then I have to think about it for a long time. I dont start painting until I have it all worked out in my mind. Im all right when I get to the easel. He often made preparatory sketches to work out his carefully calculated compositions. He and his wife kept a detailed ledger of their works noting such items as sad face of woman unlit, electric light from ceiling, and thighs cooler.For New York Movie (1939), Hopper demonstrates his thorough preparation with over fifty three sketches of the theater interior and the figure of the pensive usherette. Hopper derived his subject matter from two primary sources: one, the common features of American life (gas stations, motels, restaurants, theaters, railroads, and street scenes) and its inhabitants; and two, seascapes and rural landscapes. Regarding his style, Hopper defined himself as an amalgam of many races and not a member of any school, particularly the Ash Can school.Once he achieved his mature style, his art remained consistent and self-contained, in spite of all the art trends that came and went during his long career. Always reluctant to discuss himself and his art, Hopper simply summed up his art by stating, The whole answer is there on the canvas.Hopper was stoic and fatalistic—a quiet introverted man with a gentle sense of humor and a frank manner. Conservative in politics and social matters, he accepted things as they were and displayed a lack of idealism. Cultured and sophisticated, he was well-read, and many of his paintings show figures reading.He was generally good company and unperturbed by silences, though sometimes taciturn, grumpy or detached. He was always serious about his art and the art of others, and when asked would return frank opinions. In 1980, the groundbreaking show Edward Hopper: The Art and the Artist opened at the Whitney Museum of American Art and visited London, Düsseldorf, and Amsterdam, as well as San Francisco and Chicago. For the first time ever, this show presented Hopper's oil paintings together with preparatory studies for those works. This was the beginning of Hopper's popularity in Europe and his large worldwide reputation. In 2004, a large selection of Hopper's paintings toured Europe, visiting Museum Ludwig in Cologne, Germany, and the Tate Modern in London. The Tate exhibition became the second most popular in the gallery's history, with 420,000 visitors in the three months it was open. In 2007, an exhibition focused on the period of Hoppers greatest achievements—from about 1925 to mid-century—and was presented at the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. The exhibit comprised fifty oil paintings, thirty watercolors, and twelve prints, including the favorites Nighthawks, Chop Suey, and Lighthouse and Buildings. The exhibition was organized by the Museum of Fine Arts, Boston, the National Gallery of Art, Washington, and the Art Institute of Chicago and sponsored by the global management consulting firm Booz Allen Hamilton. [from Wikipedia] Music by Thomas Newman
Views: 20493 DistantMirrors
Edward Hopper
 
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A motion graphic talking about Edward Hopper's artwork. I use my interpretation to link some of his works to create this photostory animation. Hope everyone will have brief idea of Hopper's painting style.
Views: 409 I-Cheng Lee
KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper // Sneak Peek 4
 
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Published on Jun 1, 2015 KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper DIRECTED BY: LAUREN CARNESI Choreography by: Lauren Carnesi, Liz Fink, Alexa Conway & Leslie Perry Guest Performances by Liz Fink & Dustin Kimball Performance on Friday, July 24, 2015 Ticket Information: http://harford.universitytickets.com/user_pages/event.asp?id=864&cid=27 Harford Dance Theatre presents an all new production, KINETIC CANVAS: Edward Hopper. Inspired by the 1940s America portrayed in the stunning paintings of iconic American artist, Edward Hopper, this original dance-theater production tells a timeless yet unique story of love and hope set in the midst of WWII. Join us at 7 PM for an informative pre-show discussion on Edward Hopper, his most famous works, and the time period in which he painted to gain context on the show's inspiration! Guest Speaker: Jeffrey Ball, Associate Professor of Visual, Performing, and Applied Arts at HCC. For further information contact Jordan Williams Harford Dance Theatre Company Manager [email protected] or 443-412-2112 https://www.facebook.com/HarfordDanceTheatre?fref=ts
Views: 363 Lauren Carnesi
Art Improv #1 Edward Hopper "Gas"
 
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Thomas Maintz improvising on Edward Hoppers "Gas". Steel string baritone guitar
Views: 1083 Maintztones
Nighthawks - Historically Corrected
 
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Edward Hopper, a major contributor to American art of the 20th century, is best-known for his edgy genre paintings, many of which could easily be stills from a movie. Consisting mostly of commonplace urban scenes, featuring no more than two or three individuals, and few if any distractions, they capture the isolation of city life like no other form of modern art in America. Inspired by street photography and movies (he was an ardent moviegoer), Hopper was also a fan of Impressionism and its focus on 'the moment', something he encountered on two visits to Paris in 1906 and 1909. In addition to his signature style of city painting, he produced some outstanding coastal views - see, for instance, The Lighthouse at Two Lights (1929, Metropolitan Museum of Art, New York) at Cape Elizabeth, Maine. Although a long-term resident of New York, Hopper was born and raised in the small upstate town of Nyack, and is associated with American Scene painting - a style characterized by its use of specifically American imagery. Undoubtedly one of the greatest 20th century painters of America, he created a whole new vision of the individual in the city and revitalized the modern genre painting in the process. Edward Hopper's influential teacher Robert Henri (1865-1929), leader of the Ashcan School of American realism, sent his students out onto the streets of New York "to paint the city and city life as it really is". Mostly a studio painter himself, Henri rarely applied the formula to his own work. However, his fellow painters like John Sloan (1871-1951) and George Bellows (1882-1925), did follow the rule, producing a rough and tough kind of painting that, in the case of Bellows, was an important precursor of Abstract Expressionism (1950s). Hopper, too, despite the fact that he chose themes that fitted Henri's prescription, was also a studio painter. He worked mostly from drawings, taking a long time to evolve a design for the picture that was later modified — sometimes quite substantially — during the often highly attenuated process of completing the painting. Hopper's stunningly cinematic picture Nighthawks is one of the most reproduced paintings in the history of art. It is hard to know precisely why, except, perhaps, for the fact that we all recognize something of its truthfulness from within our own life experience. It is a picture that speaks of the alienating presence of the modern city. Several individuals - the nighthawks of the title - are gathered together in the brightly lit window of a downtown diner or cafe that spills its pale bluish light out into the street, casting a shadow on the pavement, yet barely holding a threatening inrush of darkness at bay. Beyond its reach, anything might be happening in the darkness. Psychologically speaking, these people are isolates, thrown together as a group, but also locked within themselves, prey to their own fears and fancies. It is a picture of city life in the small hours when an unnatural silence and an uncanny stillness take hold, tugging suggestively at the senses of hearing and vision. A typically minimalist composition, its geometric curves, accentuated by the Art Deco style facade and the stage-like quality of the lighting, creates a theatrical setting for the Bogart-and-Bacall couple at the counter. The cafe itself was based on a restaurant on Greenwich Avenue, Manhattan, Hopper's neighbourhood for over fifty years. Hopper himself posed in a mirror for the two men, while his wife Jo was the model for the girl. Also racism.
Views: 577 Henry Åström
Edward Hopper Night Window 1928
 
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What ? Who ? Obs ? Q ? So ? You ? Made It Into This Creative Style , Hope You Enjoy . Thank You (: Just Remeber There Many Explainations Or Questions To Edward Hopper Painting.
Views: 744 Cinx Lu
Edward Hopper
 
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Edward Hopper (1882 – 1967) was a prominent American realist painter and printmaker. While he was most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching. His stature took a sharp rise in 1931 when major museums, including the Whitney Museum of American Art and the Metropolitan Museum of Art, paid thousands of dollars for his works. He sold 30 paintings that year, including 13 watercolors.The following year he participated in the first Whitney Annual, and he continued to exhibit in every annual at the museum for the rest of his life. In 1933, the Museum of Modern Art gave Hopper his first large-scale retrospective. Hopper simply summed up his art by stating, "The whole answer is there on the canvas." Hopper's most systematic declaration of his philosophy as an artist was given in a handwritten note, entitled "Statement", submitted in 1953 to the journal, Reality: Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world. No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination. One of the weaknesses of much abstract painting is the attempt to substitute the inventions of the human intellect for a private imaginative conception. The inner life of a human being is a vast and varied realm and does not concern itself alone with stimulating arrangements of color, form and design. The term life used in art is something not to be held in contempt, for it implies all of existence and the province of art is to react to it and not to shun it. Painting will have to deal more fully and less obliquely with life and nature's phenomena before it can again become great. Though Hopper claimed that he didn't consciously embed psychological meaning in his paintings, he was deeply interested in Freud. Hopper paid particular attention to geometrical design and the careful placement of human figures in proper balance with their environment. He was a slow and methodical artist; as he wrote, "It takes a long time for an idea to strike. Then I have to think about it for a long time. I don't start painting until I have it all worked out in my mind. I'm all right when I get to the easel". He often made preparatory sketches to work out his carefully calculated compositions. He and his wife kept a detailed ledger of their works noting such items as "sad face of woman unlit", "electric light from ceiling", and "thighs cooler". Although a realist painter, Hopper's "soft" realism simplified shapes and details. He used saturated color to heighten contrast and create mood. Hopper derived his subject matter from two primary sources: one, the common features of American life (gas stations, motels, restaurants, theaters, railroads, and street scenes) and its inhabitants; and two, seascapes and rural landscapes. Regarding his style, Hopper defined himself as "an amalgam of many races" and not a member of any school, particularly the "Ashcan School". Once Hopper achieved his mature style, his art remained consistent and self-contained, in spite of the numerous art trends that came and went during his long career. Hopper's solitary figures are mostly women—dressed, semi-clad, and nude—often reading or looking out a window, or in the workplace. In the early 1920s, Hopper painted his first such images Girl at Sewing Machine (1921), New York Interior (another woman sewing) (1921), and Moonlight Interior (a nude getting into bed) (1923). Automat (1927) and Hotel Room (1931), however, are more representative of his mature style, emphasizing the solitude more overtly.....Hopper's nudes are solitary women who are psychologically exposed
Views: 755 Wijiji Arts
Edward Hopper A Prominent American Realist Painter and Printmaker
 
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Edward Hopper A Prominent American Realist Painter and Printmaker Authentic Hand Painted Canvas Art (Famous Masterpieces) Free Shipping.... http://www.FamousArtistsofHistory.com/FamousArtistPaintingsOnYourWall.php http://www.GodistheCreator.com Edward Hopper (July 22, 1882 -- May 15, 1967) was a prominent American realist painter and printmaker. While he was most popularly known for his oil paintings, he was equally proficient as a watercolorist and printmaker in etching. Both in his urban and rural scenes, his spare and finely calculated renderings reflected his personal vision of modern American life. Always reluctant to discuss himself and his art, Hopper simply summed up his art by stating, "The whole answer is there on the canvas." Hopper was stoic and fatalistic—a quiet introverted man with a gentle sense of humor and a frank manner. Conservative in politics and social matters, he accepted things as they were and displayed a lack of idealism. Cultured and sophisticated, he was well-read, and many of his paintings show figures reading. He was generally good company and unperturbed by silences, though sometimes taciturn, grumpy or detached. He was always serious about his art and the art of others, and when asked would return frank opinions. Hopper's most systematic declaration of his philosophy as an artist was given in a handwritten note, titled "Statement", submitted in 1953 to the journal, Reality: "Great art is the outward expression of an inner life in the artist, and this inner life will result in his personal vision of the world. No amount of skillful invention can replace the essential element of imagination. One of the weaknesses of much abstract painting is the attempt to substitute the inventions of the human intellect for a private imaginative conception. The inner life of a human being is a vast and varied realm and does not concern itself alone with stimulating arrangements of color, form and design. The term life used in art is something not to be held in contempt, for it implies all of existence and the province of art is to react to it and not to shun it. Painting will have to deal more fully and less obliquely with life and nature's phenomena before it can again become great." Although he is best known for his oil paintings, Hopper initially achieved recognition for his watercolors and he also produced some commercially successful etchings. Additionally, his notebooks contain high-quality pen and pencil sketches, which were never meant for public viewing. Hopper derived his subject matter from two primary sources: one, the common features of American life (gas stations, motels, restaurants, theaters, railroads, and street scenes) and its inhabitants; and two, seascapes and rural landscapes. Regarding his style, Hopper defined himself as "an amalgam of many races" and not a member of any school, particularly the "Ashcan School". Once Hopper achieved his mature style, his art remained consistent and self-contained, in spite of the numerous art trends that came and went during his long career. In focusing primarily on quiet moments, very rarely showing action, Hopper employed a form of realism adopted by another leading American realist Andrew Wyeth, but Hopper's technique was completely different from Wyeth's hyper-detailed style. In league with some of his contemporaries, Hopper shared his urban sensibility with John Sloan and George Bellows but avoided their overt action and violence. Where Joseph Stella and Georgia O'Keeffe glamorized the monumental structures of the city, Hopper reduced them to everyday geometrics and he depicted the pulse of the city as desolate and dangerous rather than "elegant or seductive". Hopper's influence on the art world and pop culture is undeniable. Though he had no formal students, many artists have cited him as an influence, including Willem de Kooning, Jim Dine, and Mark Rothko. An illustration of Hopper's influence is Rothko's early work Composition I (c. 1931`), which is a direct paraphrase of Hopper's Chop Suey.
Views: 993 mjmj007a
Pascal Deswaeme, EDWARD HOPPER & Style : Tribute 1
 
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Pascal Deswaeme, EDWARD HOPPER & Style : Tribute 1
Views: 107 pascal deswaeme
Part I: Painting Edward Hopper's "The Long Leg"
 
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Painting Edward Hopper's "The Last Leg"
Views: Gayle Kiley
Edward Hopper
 
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Hopper paid particular attention to geometrical design and the careful placement of human figures in proper balance with their environment. He was a slow and methodical artist; as he wrote, "It takes a long time for an idea to strike. Then I have to think about it for a long time. I don't start painting until I have it all worked out in my mind. I'm all right when I get to the easel". He often made preparatory sketches to work out his carefully calculated compositions. He and his wife kept a detailed ledger of their works noting such items as "sad face of woman unlit", "electric light from ceiling", and "thighs cooler". Although a realist painter, Hopper's "soft" realism simplified shapes and details. He used saturated color to heighten contrast and create mood. Hopper derived his subject matter from two primary sources: one, the common features of American life (gas stations, motels, restaurants, theaters, railroads, and street scenes) and its inhabitants; and two, seascapes and rural landscapes. Regarding his style, Hopper defined himself as "an amalgam of many races" and not a member of any school, particularly the "Ashcan School". Once Hopper achieved his mature style, his art remained consistent and self-contained, in spite of the numerous art trends that came and went during his long career. Hopper's solitary figures are mostly women—dressed, semi-clad, and nude—often reading or looking out a window, or in the workplace. In the early 1920s, Hopper painted his first such images Girl at Sewing Machine (1921), New York Interior (another woman sewing) (1921), and Moonlight Interior (a nude getting into bed) (1923). Automat (1927) and Hotel Room (1931), however, are more representative of his mature style, emphasizing the solitude more overtly.....Hopper's nudes are solitary women who are psychologically exposed
Edward Hopper -  Painter of Alienation
 
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Find a written version of this video at http://colinjwingfield.blogspot.com/2014/10/edward-hopper-painter-of-alienation.html If you are interested in painters and painting, try my post on Renoir at: http://colinjwingfield.blogspot.fr/2018/05/renoir-his-life-work-and-insperation.html If you like art in general, you may also like my presentation of Alfred Lord Tennyson's stirring poem, ‘Ulysses’, here: https://youtu.be/p-ndiWlLX4E For many years I have been interested in the phenomenon of psychological alienation that haunts our modern world. I think it found its clearest expression in the theories of the German-American psychologist, Erich Fromm, who was able to put into plain words the sense of disconnectedness from life felt by many people today. Then one day, while looking in a book at some reproductions of several paintings by the American painter, Edward Hopper, it struck me that here was alienation expressed in pictorial form. I decided then to make a film that would attempt to analyse a number of Hopper paintings in terms of Fromm's ideas on alienation. Credits for music used in this film: Jorge Mendez: 'Cold', 'Sleepless Night', and 'Frozen' original soundtrack music https://www.youtube.com/channel/UC65ArIbjb_Y6NUh-4h5aF8Q Lucas King: 'The Shadow People' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=kMSmZkR2o-U Kyong Lee: 'Shenandoah' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=1p3yL4-jYto Kevin Macleod: 'Lost Frontier' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=ZmmY2eyPbw4 Unknown composer: 'Music of the Spheres' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=4-GC20KIRUY Unknown composer: 'Lavender Town Piano Music' https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=3MY-v-7GHhs Pulse Emitter: 'High Altitude Golden Sunset' http://freemusicarchive.org/music/Pulse_Emitter/
Views: 97176 Colin Wingfield
Edward Hopper and the Blank Canvas (2012)
 
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This documentary examines American realist painter Edward Hopper's life, including testimonies from people who knew him, and by those inspired by his work, like German filmmaker Wim Wenders. From Mad Men to Blade Runner and The Simpsons, Hopper's scenes of modern American Life, most notably Nighthawks, have been recreated in myriad films and TV shows, while his style has influenced the likes of Alfred Hitchcock and Terrence Malick. Obsessed with the everyday, Hopper depicted all-night diners, cinemas, petrol stations, hotel lobbies and a theatre, filling them with seemingly isolated and alienated figures, because he believed loneliness was an inherent feature of city life. This documentary reveals the social and cultural context surrounding Hopper's work, while also exploring his independence as a painter, the many references to his work in film and the widespread production of his works. Source: DocuWiki Uploaded for educational purposes only
How to Use an "Edward Hopper" Brushstroke in Watercolor
 
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One of Jane's favorite watercolor artists is Edward Hopper. She talks about and demonstrates his confident strokes streaking across the page suggesting a lawn or a prairie. She also helps you understand that the energy you put into the brush stroke at the beginning and end make a difference in the mark--so be intentional about the direction and pressure of your brushstroke--in addition to deciding on the color. This painting was created in Pine River, MN. and is part of the episodes of the Pine River Painting series on Jane's YouTube Channel. We invite you to watch all the videos, comment, share, and subscribe. Thank you! Here is the link to the playlist for Pine River: https://www.youtube.com/playlist?list=PLBuTnZ7-BC0f-OmUKrpaKn9VksCObjZvW Follow us on social media: www.watchingpaintdry.com www.artinthecenter.wordpress.com www.facebook.com/watchingpaintdryllc https://twitter.com/janemmason https://www.linkedin.com/in/janemmason
Views: 1375 watchingpaintdryllc
Pascal Deswaeme, EDWARD HOPPER & Style : Tribute 2
 
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Pascal Deswaeme, EDWARD HOPPER & Style : Tribute 2
Views: 61 pascal deswaeme
At Edward Hopper’s Doorstep
 
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John Walsh Thursday, December 7, 2017, 5:30 pm https://artgallery.yale.edu/thankyoujohn Edward Hopper (1882–1967) painted Rooms by the Sea in 1951 on Cape Cod, in the place he knew best: the studio in his house in the dunes. This agreeable-looking summer scene makes some viewers feel unsettled—a reaction that the artist intended. This lecture examines how Hopper composed the picture from his familiar surroundings and proposes some of the ideas that he may have meant to convey. Generously sponsored by the Martin A. Ryerson Lectureship Fund. Followed by a reception. In each lecture in this series, John Walsh selects an American painting in the Gallery’s collection and examines the similarities and differences between depiction and reality, returning to the painter’s original vantage point in an attempt to work out just what happened when he returned to the studio. Note: This lecture is the sixth and final in the series American Views, Viewpoints, and Manipulations.
Compartment C, Car 293 - An Original Piano Score Based on Edward Hopper's Painting
 
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Full description and composer's notes below Buy the Album (Artscores, Vol. 1) - iTunes https://tinyurl.com/ya6y7dmx - Amazon Music Store https://tinyurl.com/yap6dqlm Visit the Complete Artscores Gallery https://tinyurl.com/yc7rm2ky Connect with Stuart at: https://www.socialfrequency.net/blank "Compartment C, Car 293" (1938) by Edward Hopper offers another realist glimpse into the private moments of American life during the early 20th century. In Hopper's signature style, a woman dressed entirely in black sits alone in isolation within a train compartment reading as the train journeys on. The post-sunset dusk can be seen from the train compartment's window also showing a bridge in the distance. COMPOSER'S NOTES: Being a huge fan of Hopper's work, this piece is yet another installment in his running visual commentary on loneliness, isolation, and the human condition. Given my own subjective interpretation and relation to Hopper's paintings as an artist, I knew there needed to be a touch of "dark surrender" to this piece, especially since the woman is dressed in black, including her hat. "Compartment C, Car 293" is the first artscore in which I also created a "sound design" manipulating a recording of a train moving down the tracks on a Summer evening, complete with a chorus of cicadas, with the train's horn sounding off in the distance. We peer out of the compartment's window at the beginning of the piece with the sound design edited to sound as if we are slowly moving from the exterior noise of the train from the open window deeper into the interior of the train compartment. In many ways, the muffled constant rhythm of the train is almost hypnotic which is why I kept the sound design in the audio-only version of the piece. The music opens with series of single "swaying" bass notes which evolves into a "call and response" between the left-hand and right-hand taking us on our journey through Compartment C, Car 293 with minor chord progressions to reflect the loneliness and isolation moving into a solemn variation as we see the compartment's occupant for the first time, a woman sitting alone reading. The two sections of the piece are connected and ended by a soothing "ray of light" suggesting one of my favorite expressions, "This too, shall come to pass". Another unique note about this artscore, the piece of music was actually an "orphan" of a musical idea I had roughly composed a while back and recorded a reference demo on my iPhone. I recently come across the piece and knew I had to finish it and find it a nice Artscores home. Thus, it's the first time I've actually created an artscore in "reverse" beginning with a piece of my own music, its story, and finding a painting in which the stories intersect and connect. Given the early-to-mid 20th century feel of the piece and its dark undertones, Hopper was a natural fit. Unfortunately, I have not seen this particular Hopper piece in person. According to my research, it is part of the "IBM Corporation Collection". I hope you enjoyed your Artscores journey into "Compartment C, Car 293". Stuart
edward hopper - transformation game engine
 
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edward hopper - gas transformation in game environment of Crysis video 2:49
Views: 135 Affentanz
Ink & Wash Style Watercolour of a Villiage Scene- with Chris Petri
 
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In this video we create a beautiful ink & wash painting. When we create these types of paintings it helps us to strengthen our drawing and shading skills. Enjoy and Happy Painting everyone! Please feel free to contact me on you tube or at [email protected] with any questions or special requests. You may also view my web site at chrispetri.com on a google search. All of my Introduction videos are written and produced by Carmen Rodriguez. The following are key words related to the You Tube platform as well as good research terms. watercolors, painting, and drawing, Watercolours, Tutorials, How to paint, How to draw, contour drawing, colors, soft colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, palettes, Craig Young, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, Fabriano, Buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, masonite, out of the tube color, Favorite watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Steven Cronin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Greg Allen, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Edward Wesson, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, Chris Forsey, David Curtis, Bill Buchman, Robert Burridge, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tony Van Hasselt, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper and Norman Rockwell, Judi Wagner, Jeanne Dobie, Adebanji Alade, William Alexander, Bob Ross, Lynn Pittard, Burne Hogarth, Andrew Loomis, G.F. Brommer, Stephen Quiller, YouTube views, Agnescecile, Darrell Tank, peter wooley artist, Fine Art-Tips, Mr. Otter Art Studio, Painting fast and slow, tonal value, design, angles, the rectangle, the tick tack toe, the golden mean, leading the eye, directional changes, push and pull, fresh paintings, muddy paintings, greys, colors vibrancy, roygbiv, munsel, triadic, space division, rough paper, smooth paper, cold press, hot press, acid free, 100% cotton, print paper, swatches, H strokes, Z stokes, lose edges, keep edges, chroma, intensity, value range, pastel, acrylic, oils, fumes, health hazards, poison paints, cakes, pans, tubes, semi moist, chalky, transparent, semi-transparent, lifting, staining, opaque, granulation, sediment, juicy washes, loose and free watercolors, tight watercolors, misbehaving watercolors, blossoms, cauliflowers, balloons, International Artist magazine, Watercolor magazine, Blicks, AC Moore, Pearl Paints, Cheap Joes, Jerrys Artsarama, Micheals, Art Express, sumi inks, speedball ink, urban sketching, Teoh Yi Chie, stretching paper, taping paper, blocks, workshops, art institutes, art schools, perspective, line of site, eye level, cone of vision, vanishing point. Watercolor painting is passion! I have the greatest respect and honor for art! These things all relate closely to my art. Watercolors, colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, pallettes, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, fabriano, buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, Masonite, Hal Reed- Fav watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Winslow Homer, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, David Curtis, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper, Hal Reed, and Norman Rockwell.
Views: 225 Chris Petri
The Art of David Lynch
 
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Video-essay on David Lynch and his love of art that shines through in all of his work. I compared scenes from Twin Peaks, Eraserhead and Blue Velvet to paintings of Rene Margritte, Edward Hopper, Arnold Böcklin and Francis Bacon. Made by Menno Kooistra for VoorDeFilm. Music: Cecilia Lopez and Wenchi Lazo - En Las Cuevas Thanks for watching! Consider a thumb up and don't forget to subscribe to the channel. Greatly appreciated! Here are all our video essay's. Fresh ones added every two weeks: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=XOyzvV9mti0&list=PLTrtCZvdkZqmZb-6P5YkjjbXBRrqGioj3 Web: http://www.voordefilm.nl Facebook: http://www.facebook.com/voordefilm Twitter: http://www.twitter.com/voordefilm
Views: 68144 VoorDeFilm
Edward Hopper's New York: A Walking Tour
 
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Whitney curator Carter Foster visits sites in downtown New York that inspired Hopper's iconic paintings.
Edward Hopper
 
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Art project presentation vid.
Charles Santarpia~ Realist Painter
 
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Take a look at some of the paintings that Charles Santarpia of Branford, Connecticut has done, his work is amazing. He never took an art lesson and yet his oil paintings look like photos, Edward Hopper style. For more stories on people in Connecticut go to http://www.NetworkConnecticut.com
Views: 581 Ann Nyberg
Edvard Munch: What A Cigarette Means
 
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HELP ME MAKE MORE VIDEOS: http://www.patreon.com/nerdwriter TUMBLR: http://thenerdwriter.tumblr.com TWITTER: https://twitter.com/TheeNerdwriter Email me here: [email protected] SOURCES: Patricia Berman, "Edvard Munch's Self-Portrait with Cigarette: Smoking and the Bohemian Persona The Art Bulletin, Vol. 75, No. 4 (Dec., 1993), pp. 627-646 Patricia Berman, "(Re-) Reading Edvard Munch: Trends in the Current Literature" Scandinavian Studies, Vol. 66, No. 1 (Winter 1994), pp. 45-67 Max Nordau, "Degeneration" https://archive.org/details/degeneration035137mbp 1892 (The chapter on the Decadents is the most relevant to this video) Dr. L. Bremer, "Tobacco, Insanity and Nervousness" 1892 https://archive.org/details/39002011211464.med.yale.edu
Views: 904649 Nerdwriter1
Edward Hopper
 
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Американский художник Эдвард Хоппер (Edward Hopper) (1882-1967) зарабатывал на жизнь в сфере рекламы и книжно-журнальной иллюстрации. У него узнаваемый стиль, нашедший выражение в городских жанровых сценках, в пейзажах Нью-Йорка и провинции Америки. Многие из картин часто фигурируют на книжных обложках и в визуальной рекламе. DesigNonstop.com - О дизайне без остановки!
Views: 399 Natasha Klever
Edward Hopper  愛德華·霍珀  (1882 - 1967) New Realism   American Realism  Ashcan  American
 
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[email protected] Edward Hopper (1882–1967)- Edward Hopper's enigmatic depictions of America are indelibly etched in the memory of those viewing his work. Born in New York in 1882, Hopper showed early interest in art, particularly drawing, and went on to study illustration and painting. With their emphasis on truthful, contemporary subjects, his teachers Robert Henri and Kenneth Hayes Miller at the New York School of Art were vital to Hopper's development as a realist. Hopper made three long visits to Paris between 1906 and 1910; yet, aside from admiring Impressionism, he was not attracted to modern art. Although he sold his first oil painting in the Armory Show in 1913, he continued to pursue commercial illustration as a career. In 1920 Hopper had his first one-person exhibition at the Whitney Studio Club in New York, and in 1924 he sold all of his works from a solo show at another New York gallery. This success allowed him to dedicate himself to painting. By the late 1920s, Hopper developed his mature style, characterized by depictions of lonely urban and small town scenes in which there may be only a few silent, solitary figures. Often he shows only the drab architecture, devoid of human life. Hopper’s vision of the American scene was one of alienation and anxiety. His life and art were remarkably consistent: a very private person, he endowed the figures in his paintings with a similar sense of detachment. Hopper divided his time between a small apartment in New York’s Greenwich Village and trips to New England, continuing to synthesize and distill his observations of contemporary life into hauntingly familiar scenes. Hopper died in New York in 1967. 愛德華·霍珀(1882年至1967年)愛德華·霍珀的美國神秘的描繪那些觀看他的作品的記憶是不可磨滅的蝕刻。出生於紐約,1882年,霍珀表現出對藝術的早期興趣,特別是繪畫,並繼續學習繪畫插圖。在他們的重點放在真實的,當代的主題,他的老師羅伯特·亨利和肯尼斯·海耶斯米勒在藝術紐約學校都以霍珀的發展作為一個現實主義者至關重要。霍珀1906年提出到1910年之間的三個長訪問巴黎;然而,除了欣賞印象派,他並沒有吸引到現代藝術。雖然他在1913年賣掉了他的第一個油畫在軍械庫展,他繼續追求商業插畫作為一種職業。 1920年,霍珀了他的第一個人的展覽在惠特尼工作室俱樂部在紐約,並在1924年,他賣掉他所有的作品從另一個紐約的畫廊個展。這次成功讓他獻身於繪畫。到了20世紀20年代末,霍珀發展了他的成熟風格,其特點是孤獨的城市和小城鎮的場景,其中有可能是只有少數沉默,孤獨的人物描寫。他通常只顯示單調的建築,泯滅人的生命。 Hopper的美國情景設想是異化和焦慮之一。他的生活和藝術是非常一致:一個非常注重隱私的人,他賦予在他的畫中人物有類似的超脫感。霍珀在紐約的格林威治村劃分了他的時間的一個小公寓之間以及前往新英格蘭,繼續綜合和提煉他的當代生活的觀察到讓人流連忘返熟悉的場景。霍珀在紐約逝世於1967年。
Views: 157 Tuen Tony Kwok
Blick Lesson Plans: Hoppers Window
 
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A dimensional self-portrait in the style of Edward Hopper. A recurring theme in Hopper’s art is windows, offering glimpses into a story within a painting. What story would be revealed to a viewer looking at your life through a window? Grade Level: 5 – 12 http://www.dickblick.com/lessonplans/look-through-my-window/
Views: 2780 Blick Art Materials
HOPPER'S SILENCE
 
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Excerpt from the film HOPPER'S SILENCE. One of the most recognizable works of American art, Edward Hopper's painting Nighthawks at the Diner encapsulates the alienation and loneliness of the modern urban milieu. His haunting, enigmatic paintings are defined by a hard-edged realism and the presence of isolated figures alone in their thoughts. In life, Hopper was notoriously taciturn and seldom gave interviews or appeared in public. Director Brian O'Doherty, who knew Hopper and his wife, Jo, offers a rare documentary portrait of this aloof artist that is astute and revealing. O'Doherty compares the paintings to the locations that inspired them to suggest the connection between style and subject. Plus, Hopper and Jo are shown in footage from an old television interview, in which the painter is one step this side of mute. Jo often answers for him, a telling detail that says much about their relationship. The film's subtle combination of observation and interview footage contains a surprising amount of insight and information. "Offers interesting and pragmatic insights and avoids undue presumption or esoteric analysis" (NY Times). "An exquisite portrait of this quiet artist and his world" (Getty Center). Brian O'Doherty---USA---1981---47 mins. For more info on this film, please visit http://www.facetsdvd.com/product-p/dv102363.htm. Facets Multi-Media is a non-profit media arts organization founded in Chicago in 1975, and dedicated to making cinema accessible to all through film preservation, distribution, presentation, and education. For more information, visit http://www.facets.org.
Edward Hoppe_ Complete Works
 
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Edward Hopper, (born July 22, 1882, Nyack, N.Y., U.S.—died May 15, 1967, New York City) American painter whose realistic depictions of everyday urban scenes shock the viewer into recognition of the strangeness of familiar surroundings. He strongly influenced the Pop art and New Realist painters of the 1960s and 1970s. Hopper was initially trained as an illustrator, but, between 1901 and 1906, he studied painting under Robert Henri, a member of a group of painters called the Ashcan School. Hopper travelled to Europe three times between 1906 and 1910, but he remained untouched by the experimental work then blossoming in France and continued throughout his career to follow his own artistic course. Although he exhibited paintings in the Armory Show of 1913, he devoted most of his time to advertising art and illustrative etchings until 1924. He then began to do such watercolours as Model Reading (1925), as well as oil paintings. Like the painters of the Ashcan School, Hopper painted the commonplaces of urban life. But, unlike their loosely organized, vivacious paintings, his House by the Railroad (1925) and Room in Brooklyn (1932) show still, anonymous figures and stern geometric forms within snapshot-like compositions that create an inescapable sense of loneliness. This isolation of his subjects was heightened by Hopper’s characteristic use of light to insulate persons and objects in space, whether in the harsh morning light (Early Sunday Morning, 1930) or the eerie light of an all-night coffee stand (Nighthawks, 1942). Hopper’s mature style was already formed by the mid-1920s. His subsequent development showed a constant refinement of his vision. Such late paintings as Second-Story Sunlight (1960) are distinguished by extremely subtle spatial relationships and an even greater mastery of light than is seen in his work of the 1920s.
Views: 295 Tuen Tony Kwok
Feedback from Orangetown Historical Museum - "Edward Hopper's Backyard" Wall Mural by KDF
 
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http://www.kdf-comp.com Elizabeth Skrabonja and Mary Cardenas of the Orangetown Historical Museum and Archives sing the praises of a large format color wall mural produced by KDF for their latest exhibit, "Edward Hopper's Backyard"--a historical glimpse at the life of the famous Nyack-born impressionist painter. Open now through December 9th 2011. Visit http://www.orangetownmuseum.com.
Views: 113 Stephen Hoey
Tom Waits Edward Hopper Nighthawks animation
 
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I'm a huge fan of Edward Hopper and Tom Waits. Just pulled this little animation out of the dustbin. I created this animation more than 10 years ago when I took a class to learn Macromedia Director (Remember them, Adobe users?). Flash was just taking off and I chose to learn Director instead. Oh well...I love the end result, a nice homage to two of my favorite artists..... Technical background: For the longest time I couldn't play this animation due to the lack of support on Macs for the classic environment, but finally found a solution yesterday! Found out that OS X.6 doesn't automatically install Rosetta, so I manually installed it and was able to view the .dir files in my Safari browser. Then I used Snapz X to record the video playback. Works like a charm!
Views: 12521 FirstFramesPhotos
Shore Painting En Plein Air- with Chris Petri ( Part 1 of 2 )
 
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I hope everyone enjoys this quick and raw video of my trip to the shore today. Its a great experience to paint en plein air / outdoors. Please leave comments of your thoughts on this style video? Thumbs up if you enjoyed this video also my friends! Happy Painting everyone! Please feel free to contact me on you tube or at [email protected] with any questions or special requests. You may also view my web site at chrispetri.com on a google search. The following are key words related to the You Tube platform as well as good research terms. watercolors, painting, and drawing, Watercolours, Tutorials, How to paint, How to draw, contour drawing, colors, soft colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, palettes, Craig Young, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, Fabriano, Buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, masonite, out of the tube color, Favorite watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Steven Cronin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Greg Allen, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Edward Wesson, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, Chris Forsey, David Curtis, Bill Buchman, Robert Burridge, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tony Van Hasselt, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper and Norman Rockwell, Judi Wagner, Jeanne Dobie, Adebanji Alade, William Alexander, Bob Ross, Lynn Pittard, Burne Hogarth, Andrew Loomis, G.F. Brommer, Stephen Quiller, YouTube views, Agnescecile, Darrell Tank, peter wooley artist, Fine Art-Tips, Mr. Otter Art Studio, Painting fast and slow, tonal value, design, angles, the rectangle, the tick tack toe, the golden mean, leading the eye, directional changes, push and pull, fresh paintings, muddy paintings, greys, colors vibrancy, roygbiv, munsel, triadic, space division, rough paper, smooth paper, cold press, hot press, acid free, 100% cotton, print paper, swatches, H strokes, Z stokes, lose edges, keep edges, chroma, intensity, value range, pastel, acrylic, oils, fumes, health hazards, poison paints, cakes, pans, tubes, semi moist, chalky, transparent, semi-transparent, lifting, staining, opaque, granulation, sediment, juicy washes, loose and free watercolors, tight watercolors, misbehaving watercolors, blossoms, cauliflowers, balloons, International Artist magazine, Watercolor magazine, Blicks, AC Moore, Pearl Paints, Cheap Joes, Jerrys Artsarama, Micheals, Art Express, sumi inks, speedball ink, urban sketching, Teoh Yi Chie, stretching paper, taping paper, blocks, workshops, art institutes, art schools, perspective, line of site, eye level, cone of vision, vanishing point. Watercolor painting is passion! I have the greatest respect and honor for art! These things all relate closely to my art. Watercolors, colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, pallettes, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, fabriano, buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, Masonite, Hal Reed- Fav watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Winslow Homer, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, David Curtis, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper, Hal Reed, and Norman Rockwell.
Views: 5492 Chris Petri
Stairway (1949). Translated by John Style, Anthony Pym and Lawrence Venuti
 
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Stairway (1949). Translated by John Style, Anthony Pym and Lawrence Venuti Intercultural Studies Group, Tarragona, February 25, 2015 Poem in Catalan by Ernest Farrés, from his book Edward Hopper. The poet reads the text here: https://www.youtube.com/watch?v=LOYBvUc69UE&index Venuti's translation was published in 2006.
Views: 188 Anthony Pym
Shirley: Visions of Reality Official Trailer (2014) - Gustav Deutsch, Edward Hopper Movie HD
 
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Subscribe to TRAILERS: http://bit.ly/sxaw6h Subscribe to COMING SOON: http://bit.ly/H2vZUn Subscribe to INDIE & FILM FESTIVALS: http://bit.ly/1wbkfYg Like us on FACEBOOK: http://goo.gl/dHs73 Follow us on TWITTER: http://bit.ly/1ghOWmt Shirley: Visions of Reality Official Trailer (2014) - Gustav Deutsch, Edward Hopper Movie HD 13 of Edward Hopper's paintings are brought alive by the film, telling the story of a woman, whose thoughts, emotions and contemplations let us observe an era in American history. Shirley is a woman in America in the 1930s, '40s, '50s, and early '60s. A woman who would like to influence the course of history with her professional and socio-political involvement. A woman who does not accept the reality of the Depression years, WWII, the McCarthy era, race conflicts and civil rights campaigns as given but rather as generated and adjustable. A woman whose work as an actress has familiarised her with the staging of reality, the questioning and shaping of it; an actress who doesn't identify her purpose and future with that of solo success or stardom but who strives to give social potency to theatre as part of a collective. A woman who cannot identify with the traditional role model of a wife yet longs to have a life partner. A woman who does not compromise in moments of professional crisis and is not afraid to take on menial jobs to secure her livelihood. A woman who in a moment of private crisis decides to stick with her partner and puts her own professional interest on the back burner. A woman who is infuriated by political repression yet not driven to despair, and who has nothing but disdain for betrayal. Shirley, an attractive, charismatic, committed, emancipated woman.
Views: 138960 Movieclips Indie
Preparing to Paint a Watercolor -  with Chris Petri
 
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In this video we will demonstrate how to set yourself up for success when attempting a watercolor painting,... no matter what the subject matter. Laying out your colors and paint on your palette before you paint will save you undue stress and create more time for you to concentrate on the painting and all that's happening within the rectangle. Happy Painting everyone! Please feel free to contact me on you tube or at [email protected] with any questions or special requests. You may also view my web site at chrispetri.com on a google search. The following are key words related to the You Tube platform as well as good research terms. watercolors, painting, and drawing, Watercolours, Tutorials, How to paint, How to draw, contour drawing, colors, soft colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, palettes, Craig Young, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, Fabriano, Buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, masonite, out of the tube color, Favorite watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Steven Cronin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Greg Allen, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Edward Wesson, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, Chris Forsey, David Curtis, Bill Buchman, Robert Burridge, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper and Norman Rockwell, Judi Wagner, Jeanne Dobie, Adebanji Alade, William Alexander, Bob Ross, Lynn Pittard, Burne Hogarth, Andrew Loomis, G.F. Brommer, Stephen Quiller, YouTube views, Agnescecile, Darrell Tank, peter wooley artist, Fine Art-Tips, Mr. Otter Art Studio, Painting fast and slow, tonal value, design, angles, the rectangle, the tick tack toe, the golden mean, leading the eye, directional changes, push and pull, fresh paintings, muddy paintings, greys, colors vibrancy, roygbiv, munsel, triadic, space division, rough paper, smooth paper, cold press, hot press, acid free, 100% cotton, print paper, swatches, H strokes, Z stokes, lose edges, keep edges, chroma, intensity, value range, pastel, acrylic, oils, fumes, health hazards, poison paints, cakes, pans, tubes, semi moist, chalky, transparent, semi-transparent, lifting, staining, opaque, granulation, sediment, juicy washes, loose and free watercolors, tight watercolors, misbehaving watercolors, blossoms, cauliflowers, balloons, International Artist magazine, Watercolor magazine, Blicks, AC Moore, Pearl Paints, Cheap Joes, Jerrys Artsarama, Micheals, Art Express, sumi inks, speedball ink, urban sketching, Teoh Yi Chie, stretching paper, taping paper, blocks, workshops, art institutes, art schools, perspective, line of site, eye level, cone of vision, vanishing point. Watercolor painting is passion! I have the greatest respect and honor for art! These things all relate closely to my art. Watercolors, colors, painting, wet into wet, juicy washes, dry brush, splashing, splattering, pallettes, brushes, kolinsky sables, red sables, sword liners, filberts, daggers, flat brush, square brush, round brushes, masking fluid, liquid frisket, rigger brushes, arches, fabriano, buckingford, Strathmore, French easel, glass top art table, Masonite, Hal Reed- Fav watercolor artist’s- Charles Reid, Winslow Homer, Alvaro Castagnet, Edward Hopper, Mel Stabin, Edgar Whitney, Steve Hall, Edward Wesson, Amanda Hyatt, Claude Monet, Herman Pekel, Edward Hopper, John Hoar, Winslow Homer, Joseph Zbukvic, Winslow Homer, David Curtis, Edward Wesson, Ken Howard, John Tookey, Andrew Pitt, Tom Lynch, John Yardley, Jake Winkle, Tom Hoffman, Zoltan Szabo, Ed Whitney, Winslow Homer, Andrew Wyeth, Edward Wesson, Ed Hopper, Hal Reed, and Norman Rockwell.
Views: 1669 Chris Petri
(Edward Hopper) The King of oak Street by kenny Rogers
 
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